“What About Covina?” By: Laurie Fahey

“What About Covina?” By: Laurie Fahey

March 3, 2021

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By Laurie Fahey

Laurie Fahey

Hello I am Laurie Fahey with Serenity Realty. I am licensed Realtor and a Certified Foreclosures and Short Sale Resource. I specialize in Residential and Multi- Family Commercial Real Estate. Contact me today, I am here to help. DRE#01971002

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Laurie Fahey

History & Fun Facts

 

Covina, founded in 1882, is seven square miles and located in the heart of the East San Gabriel Valley, approximately 22 miles east of Downtown Los Angeles. It is centered in the midst of Interstate freeways 10, 210, and 605, and State Route 57. Covina’s population is approximately 47,880 yet, back in 1900, it was known as one of the smallest cities in the whole country.

Present-day Covina was originally within the homelands of the indigenous Tongva people for 5,000 to 8,000 years. In the 18th century it the became part of Rancho La Puente in Alta California, a 1770s Spanish colonial and 1842 Mexican land grant.

The City of Covina was named by a young engineer, Frederick Eaton, who was hired by Phillips to survey the area. Impressed by the way that the valleys of the adjacent San Gabriel Mountains formed a natural cove around the vineyards that had been planted by the region’s earlier pioneers, Eaton merged the words “cove” and “vine”, and in 1885, created the name Covina for the new township.

The city was incorporated in 1901, the city’s slogan, “One Mile Square and All There”, was coined by Mrs F. E. Wolfarth, the winner of a 1922 slogan contest sponsored by the chamber of commerce.

It was not vineyards but orange and grapefruit groves that blanketed the city. By 1909, the city was the third-largest orange producer in the world, and it still claimed to have “the best oranges in the world” as late as the 1950s. Since World War II, however, the orange groves have been largely replaced by single-family (houses) and multiple-family (apartments) dwellings.

The Covina Valley Historical Society maintains an archive illustrating the city’s history in the 1911-built Firehouse Jail Museum, Covina’s first municipal building, located immediately behind City Hall in Covina’s Old Town.

It has been a sister city of Xalapa, Mexico, since 1964. A replica of a giant stone Olmec head, located in a place of honor in Parque Xalapa, was given to the city in 1989 by the state of Veracruz. According to the placard placed below the head, it was originally excavated from San Lorenzo de Tenochtitlan. The statue was later moved from its location in front of the police department to Jalapa Park in the southeast portion of the city.

Attractions

Covina has a fantastic Farmers Market and Family night in Heritage Park every Friday night.  This event features fresh produce, Artisans, Retail Merchandise, Food, Pony rides, Live Entertainment and much more.  Downtown Covina features a small town charm with Mom-and-Pop shops and restaurants. One of my family’s favorites is Bishamon Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar, if you are ever in Covina it is a must try place to eat.  Covina also features several family events throughout the year.  The parks and recreation programs are very popular and offer everything from Children to Adult programs and activities

Population

Covina has a population of 48,601 (2020 Census) with a median income of $64,469 and median age of 36.3 years.

Schools

Covina has 26 schools of which 8 are private and 18 are public.

Public School Ratings are displayed in the table below.

Schools with highest ratings:

Real Estate Market

SFR

 

Single Family Residence

Condominium

Median Price

$671,500

$350,000

Price Per Square Foot

$414

$345

 

Here is the rental market in Covina:

1 Bedroom

2 bedroom

3 bedroom

4 bedroom

Median Rent

$ 1480

$1913

$2563

$2823

 

covina california

 

Resources: Altos.re, bestplaces.net, Infosparks, Covinaca.gov & Wikipedia

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